Posts Tagged ‘Hunting in Colorado’

ELK HUNTING 101 IN DENVER SEPT. 27

September 15, 2012

DENVER — Colorado Parks and Wildlife will host a basic seminar for hunting elk in Colorado as a part of our Hunter Outreach Program efforts to educate and involve new hunters in the sport. This seminar will cover the fundamentals of habits/habitat, hunting tactics and techniques and provide a good beginning for the novice elk hunter.  Registration is limited to 75 participants. Join the fastest growing family of hunters in Colorado for an educational evening.

WHO: Everyone

WHEN: Thursday Sept. 27, from 6:30 to 9 PM

WHERE: Hunter Education Building, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, 6060 Broadway, Denver, CO 80216

COST: No cost

SIGN UP: To register please email wildlife.neoutreach@state.co.us or call 303-291-7804 and leave a message with name(s), address and phone number to register.

For more information on hunting in Colorado, go to:

http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/Pages/Hunting.aspx

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

4TH SEASON DATE: HIGH-QUALITY HUNTS IN MEEKER

September 15, 2012

MEEKER, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife and the Miller Creek Ranch in Meeker are offering big-game hunters an opportunity to apply for a limited number of private property, high-quality elk and mule deer hunts beginning Nov. 3.

Interested hunters must submit a written application by 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012 to:

Colorado Parks and Wildlife – Meeker Office
Attn:  Bailey Franklin/Special Miller Creek Ranch Hunts
PO Box 1181, Meeker CO 81641

The application can be found at: http://parks.state.co.us/SiteCollectionImages/parks/Misc/MeekerHuntApplication.pdf

Nine hunts will be available to hunters who have already drawn limited deer and elk licenses for Game Management Unit 23 during the 2012 big game hunting seasons. In addition, one public bull elk hunt will be available to any big game hunter that plans to purchase an unlimited, over-the-counter bull elk license for the third rifle season in 2012.

“This is a rare, high-quality private land hunting experience,” said District Wildlife Manager Bailey Franklin. “We encourage sportsmen to take advantage of this chance to enjoy a once-in-a-lifetime hunt.”

The unique opportunity developed through a working relationship between Colorado Parks and Wildlife and Miller Creek Ranch landowner Richard Bachmann.

As part of their efforts in a large-scale big game habitat protection and improvement project, local wildlife managers reached a mutual agreement with Bachmann to set aside a perpetual conservation easement on his 3,100-acre ranch property, located in GMU 23.

A portion of the agreement stipulates that a limited amount of public access for mule deer and elk hunting will be made available annually and will be cooperatively implemented by the agency, Bachman and property manager Joe Collins.

The Miller Creek Ranch is within the White River mule deer and elk herd units, two of the largest big game populations in the state of Colorado. The ranch features a variety of habitat, including high elevation aspen and conifer forest, mountain shrub lands and lower elevation pinyon-juniper woodland and sagebrush.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is accepting applications until the Oct. 10 deadline. The hunts are open to all eligible hunters; however, preference will be given to youth and military veterans that apply. There is no cost associated with the application. The following hunts will be available and hunters should be specific about which of these hunting seasons/opportunities they are interested and eligible to apply for:

ONE UNGUIDED ANTLERED/BUCK DEER HUNT ON MILLER CREEK RANCH

Third regular rifle season – Nov. 3 through Nov. 11 2012
OR
Fourth limited rifle season – Nov. 14 through Nov. 18 2012

To be eligible, applicants must have drawn a limited deer license in either:
– DM012O3R
– DM012O4R
– DE011P3R

Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in buck mule deer hunt in the application.

One hunter will be selected from a pool of eligible applicants to hunt a buck deer during only one of the two potential buck deer hunt dates specifically listed above for 2012.

ONE UNGUIDED ANTLERLESS/DOE DEER HUNT ON MILLER CREEK RANCH
Third regular rifle season – Nov. 3 through Nov. 11 2012

Applicant must have drawn a limited antlerless deer license in either:
– DF012O3R
– DE011P3R

Applicants must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in doe mule deer hunt in the application.

One hunter will be selected from a pool of eligible applicants to hunt a doe deer during the hunt dates specifically listed above for 2012.

ONE UNGUIDED ANTLERED/BULL ELK HUNT ON MILLER CREEK RANCH

Third regular OTC rifle season – Nov. 3 through Nov. 11 2012
OR
Fourth limited rifle season – Nov. 14 through Nov. 18 2012

All hunters are eligible to apply for this public bull elk hunt during the third rifle season.

Applicants that have drawn a limited, either sex license for EE012O4R are also eligible to apply for this bull elk hunt but would be restricted to the fourth, limited rifle season.

Applicant must confirm that they are planning to purchase an over-the-counter bull elk license for the third rifle elk season, or have already drawn a fourth rifle limited elk license.

Applicants must indicate interest in the bull elk hunt in application.

One hunter from the pool of eligible applicants will be selected to hunt a bull elk during only one of the two potential bull elk hunt dates specifically listed above for 2012.

7 UNGUIDED COW ELK HUNTS ON MILLER CREEK RANCH

- Third regular OTC rifle season – Nov. 3 through Nov. 11 2012
– Fourth limited rifle season – Nov. 14 through Nov. 18 2012
– Latter portion of the late, private-land-only rifle season:  Oct. 24 through Nov. 11 2012
– Late rifle December PLO cow elk season – Hunt 1:  Dec. 1 through Dec. 6 2012
– Late rifle December PLO cow elk season – Hunt 2:  Dec. 7 through Dec. 12 2012
– Late rifle December PLO cow elk season – Hunt 3:  Dec. 13 through Dec. 18 2012

In order to be eligible to apply for one of the seven public cow elk hunts, applicant must have drawn a limited antlerless or either-sex elk license in either:
– EF012O3R
– EE012O4R
– EF011P5R
– EF023P5R

Applicant must confirm eligibility and must specifically indicate which of the cow elk hunts listed above that they are applying for in the application.

CPW will select seven hunters from pool of eligible applicants to hunt cow elk during any of the six potential cow elk hunt dates specifically listed above for 2012.

The ten hunters will be notified by mail soon after the deadline. In addition, those selected will receive specific dates and details from Colorado Parks and Wildlife, including a hunt packet detailing special travel restrictions and hunting access rules.

For more information or questions, call Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Meeker office at 970-878-6090.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife was created by the merger of Colorado State Parks and the Colorado Division of Wildlife, two nationally recognized leaders in conservation, outdoor recreation and wildlife management. Colorado Parks and Wildlife manages 42 state parks, all of Colorado’s wildlife, more than 300 state wildlife areas and a host of recreational programs.

To learn more about Colorado’s state parks, please see: http://www.parks.state.co.us

To learn more about Colorado’s wildlife programs, please see: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

HIGH-QUALITY HUNTS ANNOUNCED IN MEEKER

September 12, 2011

Folks, this is nothing short of incredible! Perhaps if time allows I will run a series about hunting in this very area for more than twenty years…

MEEKER, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife, in cooperation with two local landowners, is  offering big-game hunters  an opportunity to apply for a limited number of high-quality elk and mule deer hunts on private ranch land in the Meeker area.

A total of 27 hunts will be available to hunters who have already drawn limited deer and elk licenses for Game Management Unit 23 for the coming big-game seasons. Hunters who are interested in applying for these hunts must do so in writing by October 3.

“This is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for hunters,” said District Wildlife Manager Bailey Franklin. “We encourage everyone to take advantage of this chance to enjoy this rare, high-quality private land hunting experience.”

This unusual opportunity grew out of the working relationship between local rancher Mike Grady, the Klinglesmith family and wildlife managers with Colorado Parks and Wildlife. Local wildlife managers are spearheading a large-scale big-game habitat improvement effort in the region. Grady and the Klinglesmith family have placed conservation easements on more than 13,000 acres of important big-game habitat in the area and are participating in the habitat improvement program.

The properties are within the White River mule deer and elk herd units, which are the two largest big-game populations in the state of Colorado. Habitat varies on the 13,000-acre properties, consisting of high elevation aspen forest, mountain shrub lands and lower elevation pinyon-juniper woodland and sagebrush.

A limited amount of public access for mule deer and elk hunting was negotiated as part of the perpetual conservation easement agreements on both the LK Ranch and the Grady properties, which are jointly managed as a big-game recreational hunting enterprise. Some limited form of public access will now occur annually on these properties.

Between now and October 3, the Meeker Service Center of Colorado Parks and Wildlife will be accepting applications from hunters with valid tags for GMU 23. These hunts are open to all eligible hunters, though special preference will be given to youth and military veterans. There is no cost associated with the application.

The following hunts will be available:

FOUR UNGUIDED BUCK MULE DEER HUNTS
–  Second regular rifle season – 10/22 through 10/30/2011
– Applicant must have drawn a limited deer license for DM012O2R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in buck deer hunts
– Five day access – Days are selected by landowners and the Meeker District Wildlife Manager

FOUR UNGUIDED BULL ELK HUNTS
- Fourth regular rifle season – 11/16 to 11/20/2011
– Applicant must have drawn a limited elk license for EE012O4R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in the bull elk hunt

19 UNGUIDED LATE-SEASON COW ELK HUNTS
- First Cow Season – 11/25 to 11/29/2011
– Five hunters will be selected
– Applicant must have drawn a limited license, or purchase a leftover license for hunt code EF011P5R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in the first season cow elk hunt

- Second Cow season - 12/3 to 12/7/2011
– Five hunters will be selected
– Applicant must have drawn a limited license or purchase a leftover license for hunt code EF023P5R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in the second season cow elk hunt

- Third Cow season – 12/11 to 12/15/2011
– Five hunters will be selected
– Applicant must have drawn a limited license or purchase a leftover license for hunt
code EF023P5R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and note interest in the third cow elk hunt

- Fourth Cow Season – 12/19 to 12/23/2011
– Four hunters will be selected
– Applicant must have drawn a limited license or purchase a leftover license for hunt code EF023P5R
– Applicant must confirm eligibility and indicate interest in the fourth cow elk hunt

To be considered for these hunting opportunities, eligible hunters must submit an application to:

Colorado Parks & Wildlife – Meeker Service Center Attn:  Bailey Franklin/Special LK Ranch Hunts PO Box 1181, Meeker CO 81641
All applications must be received by 5 p.m. Monday, October 3, 2011.

Applications can be printed from our website at the following link: http://wildlife.state.co.us/SiteCollectionDocuments/DOW/Hunting/BigGame/LKRanchSpecialHuntApplication.pdf

Hunters who have qualified will receive notification and specific dates and details in early October.

All selected hunters will be required to follow travel restrictions and access rules designated on a LK Ranch public hunt map.

Please call the Colorado Parks and Wildlife office in Meeker with any questions, at (970) 878-6090.

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For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

DOVE HUNTING USHERS IN COLORADO’S FALL HUNTING SEASONS

August 28, 2010

I might suggest Wellington State Wildlife Area, and not just the most accessible area.

DENVER, Colo. –After months of anticipation, hunters can celebrate the beginning of Colorado’s small-game hunting seasons when dove season opens statewide Wednesday, Sept. 1.  An abundant dove population coupled with nearly 170,000 acres of “free” walk-in hunting access will offer ample opportunities for eager wing shooters.

“This year’s dove season looks very promising,” said Ed Gorman, Division of Wildlife small-game manager.  “Bird numbers are good and we haven’t had any significant cold weather in August to expedite migration.   If this trend continues, there should be an excellent number of doves out there for the season opener.”

Approximately 14,000 hunters participate in Colorado’s dove season annually, making the small, fast-flying birds one of the state’s most popular and sought-after small-game species.

“Doves pose a significant challenge for even the most experienced and skilled shotgun enthusiast,” said Mark Cousins, DOW hunter education coordinator.  “In most cases, people miss more birds than they bring home, but a little practice goes a long way to improving success.  There is still some time for hunters to get out there and shoot a box or two of shells at the local sporting clays course before opening day.”

Colorado is home to three species of doves: the native mourning dove, the native white-winged dove, and the nonnative Eurasian collared-dove.

In addition to their popularity among hunters, doves are also Colorado’s most plentiful game bird and are widely dispersed throughout the state. Doves are most abundant in the plains areas east of I-25, and according to annual harvest surveys, hunters in Weld, Morgan, Adams, Arapahoe, Logan, Larimer, Yuma, Pueblo, Otero and Prowers counties harvest the greatest number of birds.

Although plentiful, doves are affected greatly by changes in the weather. One major cold front can trigger migration, causing the fair-weather birds to flee south to New Mexico, Arizona, Texas and Mexico.  Therefore, Gorman offers the following caveat to hunters:

“Hunt early and often, particularly in northeast Colorado where doves typically begin migrating by late August,” Gorman said. “Hunters should also pay close attention to the weather in the upcoming days and weeks.  While it is rare that a cool front will result in a mass migration, extended cool weather can reduce the numbers of doves and, more commonly, change distribution in certain areas.”

As the season progresses, Gorman says hunters should follow the birds as they move south.

“As dove populations decrease in northern Colorado, dove numbers in the southeast are building, offering great late-season opportunity into October,” said Gorman.

The DOW has opened more than 170,000 acres of private land to hunters through its early-season Walk-In Access program to provide even greater opportunities and land access to dove and other small-game hunters.

Beginning this year, small-game hunters are no longer required to purchase permits to hunt Walk-In Access properties.  WIA properties are now open to all hunters who possess a valid small-game license.

“Removing the barrier of the access fee makes this already successful program even better,” said Gorman.  “In addition, hunters who plan accordingly and do some pre-season scouting could be well rewarded on some of these WIA properties.”

Early-season WIA properties open Sept. 1, and many offer good opportunities for dove hunting. For best results, hunters should search for properties supporting food crops, including wheat stubble, proso-millet stubble and sunflower fields.  Areas located near water and roosting sites should also hold good numbers of doves, helping hunters to fill the generous 15-bird daily bag limit.

Colorado’s dove season runs from Sept. 1 through Nov. 9, statewide.

Small-game and upland hunters can also look forward to the debut of the following hunting seasons in the upcoming days and weeks:

Turkey
Sept. 1-Oct. 3 (West of I-25 and Game Management Units 140)
Sept. 1-Oct. 22 (East of I-25, excluding Game Management Unit 140)

Blue (Dusky) Grouse
Sept. 1-Nov. 21 (all Game Management Units west of I-25

Teal
Sept. 12-20 (Lake and Chaffee Counties and east of I-25

Chukar
Sept. 1-Nov. 28 (statewide)

Pheasant and Quail
Nov. 13 (season ending dates vary, please see 2010 Small Game Brochure for details)

The Colorado Division of Wildlife reminds small-game hunters to have a safe 2010-11 hunting season and to be mindful of the following regulations and advisories before heading into the field: 

Walk-In Access Program Atlas

The 2010 “early-season” Walk-In Access Program Brochure/Atlas is available at any authorized license agent or DOW office.  An electronic version is also available on the DOW website at:
http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/SmallGame/WalkInAccess/

The Walk-In Atlas provides detailed descriptions of each property, including the type of cover crop (corn, grass, wheat stubble, etc.) and offers other useful information and tips for hunters.

Eurasian collared-doves

Beginning this September, hunters may shoot Eurasian collared-doves year-round and enjoy unlimited bag and possession limits for this species.

Native to Asia, Eurasian collared-doves are a relative newcomer to Colorado and are considered an invasive species in the United States.  In the mid-1970s, Eurasian collared-doves were introduced to the Bahaman Islands, spread to Florida and have expanded their range across the United States during the last three decades.  The doves migrated to Colorado in the mid-1990s and have adapted well to Colorado’s variable climate.  Unlike native dove species, Eurasian doves remain in Colorado year-round. Unlimited bag and possession limits and a year-round season have been established to help control their population.

Photos of Eurasian collared-doves are available here:

http://wildlife.state.co.us/apps/ImageDB/ImageDownload.aspx?ImageId=25319&ImageSize=Print&ImageType=jpg

Harvest Information Program (HIP)

All small-game hunters must register with the Harvest Information Program before hunting anywhere in Colorado.  The HIP is a joint effort between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the DOW, and it is designed to improve small-game migratory bird-harvest estimates. Colorado requires all small-game hunters to sign up with HIP to help the Division better estimate harvest for species that are difficult to address through a general small-game survey.   Hunters may obtain HIP numbers by calling 1-866-COLOHIP (265-6447) or by going to the Colorado HIP website at:
https://www.colohip.com/.

HIP numbers must be written in the space provided on small-game licenses.

2010 Small Game Brochure

For further information on dove and all other small-game hunting seasons, including bag and possession limits, please obtain a copy of the 2010 Colorado Small Game Brochure.  Brochures are available at any DOW office, license agent or may be viewed on the DOW website at:

http://wildlife.state.co.us/NR/rdonlyres/780A905D-8639-4EB1-BBA0-20BBE1F915A8/0/smallgame.pdf

Mourning Dove Banding Program

The DOW, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and 12 other states are participating in a mourning dove banding project. This effort is part of a nationwide program to help biologists determine annual survival rates, harvest rates and distribution of the harvest, as well as to refine techniques for future dove-banding programs.  Throughout the summer, doves were trapped, fitted with aluminum, individually numbered leg bands and then released.

To assist with this research, the DOW is asking dove hunters to look for leg bands on the mourning doves they shoot. Hunters are a critical link in this mourning dove banding study. By checking all harvested doves for bands and reporting banded doves, hunters help biologists manage this important migratory game bird. Because dove bands are small, hunters can easily overlook the bands, so all birds should be checked carefully. Hunters may encounter doves banded by other states as well.

Hunters who harvest banded doves are asked to report the band number to the Federal Bird Banding Laboratory (www.reportband.gov or 1-800-327-BAND).

Rattlesnake Warning

Early-season hunters need to be aware of rattlesnakes.  Hunters with dogs should be particularly mindful of their surroundings. If a dog is bitten by a rattlesnake, take the dog to a veterinarian immediately.  A veterinarian can perform the appropriate medical analysis, treatments and inject anti-venom if needed.  Dogs can now be vaccinated against rattlesnake bites. But if bitten, even vaccinated dogs should be taken to a veterinarian as soon as possible.

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For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

BIG GAME HUNTING SEASON STORIES NOW AVAILABLE AT DOW WEB SITE

August 28, 2010

The Colorado Division of Wildlife has posted its annual story package for the 2010 Big Game Hunting Season on its Web site. All media outlets are invited to use these for specials sections, on Web sites or in regular publications. Photos from the DOW image database are also available.

These are general stories that provide basic information to big game hunters. Topics include: care of big game meat; what hunters should do if they make a mistake in the field; proper use of off-road vehicles; common violations; tips for hunting deer and elk, and more.

Go to this web site to access the stories:
http://wildlife.state.co.us/NewsMedia/BigGameHuntingStories.htm.

Following is the list of the stories available this year.
–          Caring for Your Campsite
–          Don’t Shoot a Moose
–          Essential Hunting Gear Check-list
–          High Altitude Survival
–          DOW Offers Many Information Resources for Hunters
–          What to do if You Make a Mistake While Hunting
–          Know Where You’re Hunting
–          Preference Point System Explained
–          How to Hunt Pronghorn
–          Ranching for Wildlife Program Unique
–          Colorado’s Wildlife Conservation History
–          How to Hunt Deer
–          Avoid These Common Hunting Violations
–          How to Hunt Elk
–          Taking Care of Game Meat
–          Hunting Ethics Critical to Sport
–          How to Hunt Safely
–          Hunting with Horses
–          Know the Rules of Hunting
–          Poaching a Constant Problem
–          Staying Found in the Mountains
–          Use ATVs Properly
–          Wildlife Management in Colorado

If you need photos for your publication or Web site, photos from the DOW image database can be downloaded from http://wildlife.state.co.us/NewsMedia/ImageDB/. You can browse images by category or search by keyword. Once you’ve found the image you want, simply copy and paste the image or the image URL to your computer. Caption information is included with most photos. Unless otherwise noted, please credit Colorado Division of Wildlife.

For details about hunting in specific areas in Colorado, you can contact one of the DOW’s public information specialists:
Northeast region: Jennifer Churchill (303) 291-7234
Southeast region: Michael Seraphin (719) 227-5211
Northwest region: Randy Hampton (970) 255-6162
Southwest region: Joe Lewandowski (970) 375-6708
Statewide: Tyler Baskfield (303) 291-7468
Statewide: Jerry Neal (303) 291-7161

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

ELK HUNTING UNIVERSITY

March 18, 2010

ANNOUNCING ELK HUNTING UNIVERSITY

Hey DOW Insider!

Have you ever wanted to try elk hunting and wondered; where do I start? Where do I go?  Who do I need to know?

Join Hunter Outreach Coordinator Jim Bulger, and his cadre of experienced Huntmasters, for a series of articles that will get you into the field with the confidence and skills to help you harvest an elk.  Elk Hunting University (EHU) is written by real hunters and conservationists with years of field experience, who will show you the ropes to make your hunt more successful.  Go to:

http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/ElkHuntingUniversity/EHUIntroElkHunting101.htm

where you will learn about licenses, where to hunt and tips for hunting in 2010.  Then, follow the article series for the next six months as we move through the intricacies of buying your license, scouting, marksmanship, and other key elements of planning the best Colorado elk hunt.

With over 280,000 elk, Colorado is proud to be the elk capital of the world! And the Colorado Division of Wildlife is pleased to offer the first online, species-specific hunting training Elk Hunting University.  Start building the skills today that will help you fill your tag this year.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

LANDOWNERS IN SE COLORADO CAN EARN EXTRA INCOME FROM HUNTING LEASES

January 26, 2010

The Colorado Division of Wildlife (DOW) is looking for landowners in SE Colorado to lease access for the 2010 hunting seasons.  The DOW’s Big Game Access Program (BGAP) will continue for a fourth year.  This fourth year will provide ongoing private lands access while allowing the DOW time to complete the analysis of the first three years of the pilot program (2007-2009).

The program analysis will be conducted for the first three years, including an annual evaluation to determine the ability to sustain the program and potential to expand.  The evaluation will be based on landowner satisfaction, sportsmen satisfaction, game harvest by species, economic viability, and overall participation in and success of the program.

The pilot was focused on deer and pronghorn hunting in southeast Colorado on private lands in the following Game Management Units: 116, 117, 120, 121, 122, 125, 126, and 127.  This fourth year will continue within the same GMU’s.

The DOW will pay landowners to allow big game hunting access on their property — similar to existing programs that allow access to hunt small game and upland birds.

Eligible cover types of land for this program will be upland grass or prairie habitat with a focus on pronghorn, and river bottom or riparian land with a focus on deer.  Landowners whose properties meet the requirements of this program can receive payment for allowing hunters onto their land.

Landowners whose properties meet BGAP requirements will receive payment for allowing hunters onto their land.  Payments to the landowner will range from 25-cents per acre up to a maximum of $3 per acre depending on the size of the property, type of the habitat and number of day’s access is allowed.

Landowners must apply by Feb. 25.  There will be a ranking process and properties will be rated based on habitat quality, number of pronghorn and/or deer, and budget limitations.  Only a limited number of properties can participate.  The 2010 program will begin with the fall hunting seasons.

Previous properties in the program must re-enroll to participate again in 2010.

BGAP benefits both landowners and hunters.  The benefit to landowners is that it provides additional income.  Hunters benefit because it opens up more hunting opportunities.

Enrolled properties will be clearly marked with DOW “Walk-in Access” signs.  All posting is done by the DOW.  Landowners’ names, addresses or telephone numbers are kept confidential.

Access to hunt on the land enrolled in BGAP is by walk-in only.  Hunters must have a valid license for the season they hunt in and buy a $40 BGAP permit to gain access to enrolled properties.  BGAP permits may be purchased at any license agent or DOW office.

The access stamp will apply to Pronghorn and Deer hunting only.  Any other hunting on the lands enrolled in this program (such as small game) will be at the discretion of the landowner with permission only.

Basic information on GMU’s, locations, and ranches enrolled will be posted on the Colorado Division of Wildlife website (http://wildlife.state.co.us/) prior to the big game license application deadline.  Maps of enrolled properties will be available on the internet as soon as possible after enrollment is completed.  Landowner applications may also be downloaded from the same site.

For more information, or to obtain an application to enroll your land, please contact the DOW office in Lamar at (719) 336-6600.  Correspondence can be sent addressed to the Colorado Division of Wildlife c/o BGAP, 2500 South Main St., Lamar, CO. 81052.

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

Deer Tales: Another Hunting Remembrance

January 2, 2010

Jerry, an old friend spoke with me on the phone for a bit yesterday. He reads the blog, but never comments, and asked why I don’t do more story’s  about the hunting trips that all of us enjoyed so much in the years gone by. His son Jason was listening in the background. He burst out laughing, and said that I should write about the time we went Deer /Elk hunting when he was thirteen… Jason, this is for you!

Colorado GMU 15 is rugged and beautiful. Everything that people think of when they think outdoor recreation in Colorado. The entire Lynx Pass Area is a natural wonder that you should make sure and get to at least three times if you are an outdoors person. There are Grouse, Mule Deer, Elk if you are lucky in the least, and the stream that follows the gravel road harbors great numbers of Brook Trout as well as an occasional Cutthroat and Cutt/Bow hybrid. It is also just about surrounded by “Draw” License tag areas for Elk, and in 1990 it was an OTC Deer tag. Need I say more?

Jerry,  Jason, and Michael all poured themselves into the land Cruiser and found myself and fellow hunting addict Charlie on the tiny and only spot where the land is public on the south side of Lynx Pass Road. Charlie and I were putting the finishing touches on the camp as they pulled in and all were happy that they had not only found us, but that they were in one piece. Earlier, we had heard that there had been a pretty bad accident on Gore Pass, and we hoped and prayed that our friends were not involved in it. They were all amazed that such wild beauty could be found a scant four hours from Denver.

Then things went south, so to speak…

Charlie asked if they had finally sighted in their rifles. See, he and Jerry worked together, the response was not what was expected, and Charlie reacted accordingly. Soon, after a bit of this and that, they all piled into Charlies Toyota, and headed South, as in away from our hunting area to get the rifles sighted in. This would normally have not been an issue as Charlie and myself are dyed in the wool bow hunters. But, this year our schedules and the stars just didn’t cross.

Two hours later they returned. Sadness abounded on their faces and demeanor. Jason’s new rifle simply refused to shoot straight. Charlie handed me the rifle,and said that he had tightened all the screws and so on, and that it was all over the board no matter who was behind the trigger. I nodded, and held the rifle up, and looked through the scope. It had been mounted improperly, but, something told me to look a bit farther. I rested it on the table, on top of a sleeping bag, sighted on a distant rock, and told Charlie to tap the rifle… he did,and the reticule danced. I held the rifle a little more firmly, and asked for a repeat. I got a repeat…

Jason looked like he was about to burst out in tears. I looked at him and said, “Boy,  go over to the back of my car, and get that rifle case out.” He did, and I opened the case up, and his eyes got really wide.  It was my bread and butter gun; a Remington 7mm Express that I had killed my very first Buck with near Camp Las Pulgas, on Camp Pendleton when I was a kid. I would shoot my sons 270 as it wouldn’t be right to lend his rifle to a child without his permission. Besides, he still has the 7mm Mag BDL that he “borrowed” some time in 87

A quick trip down the road, and I was satisfied that Jason could,in fact, hit the broad side of a dinner plate at 200 yards with my trusted rifle, only a slight windage adjustment was needed… ( Not to mention that the lil’ piss ant shot way tighter groups than I do with it!)

We returned to camp, and I set about getting things other than beer and whiskey ready for supper. Jerry had usedmy Wrist Rocket to secure nine Blue Grouse for the pot, and Charlie had pulled about twenty Brook Trout from the stream.

To be continued.

Banner Year Predicted for Colorado Pheasant Hunters‏

November 17, 2009

It figures… I move away,and things get better. I love hunting upland birds. Wild birds that roam free. Add a dog that loves to hunt, and you are in for a wonderful day. The sad fact though, is that most decent bird land is privately held, and getting permission to hunt is all but impossible. Now though? Perhaps things are getting better.

DENVER, Colo.–With Thanksgiving fast approaching and Colorado’s pheasant and quail seasons now in full swing, upland bird hunters have plenty to be thankful for, especially pheasant hunters on Colorado’s Eastern Plains.

An unusually wet spring and summer throughout much of Colorado’s core pheasant range improved nesting habitat, helping to boost pheasant populations to the highest numbers in years.

“There are an excellent number of pheasants this year,” said Ed Gorman, DOW small game manager.  “Every indication is that we had very good recruitment of young pheasants and good carryover of birds from last year.  The bottom line is that where there is good habitat, there are plenty of pheasants, which should translate into an exceptional year for Colorado hunters.”

According to population surveys, hunters will find the greatest number of pheasants in Yuma, Kit Carson, Phillips, Sedgwick and eastern- Logan counties, followed by improved numbers in Prowers, Baca and Cheyenne counties.

Upland hunters in Morgan, Weld and Washington counties will see better pheasant numbers over 2008; however, birds are still recovering from several years of drought conditions and populations will be more localized in these counties.

Although pheasants will be abundant in most areas, standing corn fields may pose a significant obstacle to hunters pursuing “ringnecks” during the first couple weeks of the season.

“Colorado’s corn harvest is delayed again this year because of cool, wet weather during the last several weeks,” said Gorman.  “Therefore, pheasants may concentrate in standing corn and be inaccessible to hunters until these fields have been harvested later in the season.”

Hunters would do well to look for areas where corn has already been harvested or where winter wheat is the predominant crop.  Hunting should quickly improve as the remaining corn crops are harvested and pheasants are pushed into more accessible habitat.

Quail:
Southeast Colorado scaled quail populations are in the process of recovering from the 2006 blizzard and several years of drought. Quail populations should be higher than last year, but remain below long-term averages despite good nesting conditions in 2009.

In northeast Colorado, bobwhite quail are generally restricted to the South Platte River, the Frenchman and Arickaree drainages, and scattered coveys are also found within the sandhills of Phillips and Yuma Counties.  Bobwhite quail populations appear to be improved over 2008 although, in some areas, populations are much lower than five years ago.  Even with higher water this summer, quail appear to have had a fairly good nesting and brooding season.  A delayed corn harvest in the valley, particularly the fields adjacent to the river corridor, will make hunting more difficult early in the season.

Walk-In Access Program:
The DOW Walk-In Access program offers approximately 220,000 acres of small game hunting access on private lands across the state.  Many of these areas provide opportunities for pheasant and quail hunting.

The “2009 Walk-In Atlas” and the “2009 Late Cropland Atlas” are now available and include all properties enrolled in this program. The “Late Cropland Atlas” includes only those properties which were added for the pheasant and waterfowl seasons.  Therefore, hunters must obtain both atlases to view all properties enrolled in the WIA program.

Atlases provide detailed descriptions of each property, including the type of cover crop (corn, grass, wheat stubble) and offer other useful information and tips for upland hunters.

Walk-In Atlases are available at DOW offices and license agents statewide.  An electronic version may be downloaded at the DOW Web site at http://wildlife.state.co.us/Hunting/SmallGame/WalkInAccess/ .

While the printed atlases have been written to be as accurate as possible, hunters should not hunt fields unless they are clearly marked with Walk-In Access signs.

A Walk-In Access Permit is required to hunt any WIA properties.  Permits cost $20 and are available at DOW offices and license agents statewide.

New for the 2009 season: Sprinkler corners enrolled in the WIA program are closed to hunting until farming operations have concluded.  This closure is in effect to allow harvesters to work efficiently and to minimize safety concerns to hunters and farm workers.  Corners are posted with closure signs in addition to WIA boundary signs.

Hunters are reminded to keep WIA properties clean and to never clean birds or litter on WIA areas.

Hunting Private Land:
Hunters must obtain permission to hunt on private land, whether that land is posted or not.  Hunters wishing to hunt on private land should seek permission from the landowner or lessee well in advance of their planned hunt.

Harvest Information Program:
Hunters are reminded to register with the Harvest Information Program (HIP) and get their HIP number before heading out into the field.  Hunters must write their HIP number in the space provided on their small game license.  HIP numbers can be obtained by calling 1-866-265-6447 or on the Internet at: www.colohip.com

2009 Small Game Brochure:
For more information on small game regulations, season dates and bag-and-possession limits, please pick up a copy of the 2009 Colorado Small Game brochure.  Brochures are available at any DOW office or license agents statewide.  An electronic version can be downloaded at the Division’s Web site at: http://wildlife.state.co.us/NR/rdonlyres/780A905D-8639-4EB1-BBA0-20BBE1F915A8/0/smallgame.pdf

‘Step up to Better Pheasant Hunting’
Upland hunters who would like to improve their success in the field this season are encouraged to pick up a copy of the 2009 Colorado Outdoors “Hunting Guide.”  This special edition of Colorado Outdoors magazine features “Step up to Better Pheasant Hunting,” an in-depth article providing tips and tactics on how to evaluate pheasant habitat, hunt planning and getting the most out of the Division’s Walk-In Access program.  For more information about Colorado Outdoors magazine, please visit: https://w1.buysub.com/pubs/SP/COD/COD_Subscriptions2.jsp?cds_page_id=9250&cds_mag_code=COD&id=1257352915544&lsid=93081040496049996&vid=3

For more information about Division of Wildlife go to: http://wildlife.state.co.us.

The Addiction Series: Getting ready for Wild Turkey

October 27, 2009

Yes, I know. It’s Big Game season across much of the land. Not to mention upland bird and waterfowl seasons are, or are beginning to get going depending on where you are located.

This is, however, the time to not only think about spring Turkey hunting, but to prep for it. Thinking Colorado, and probably elsewhere. This is the time of year when you will most probably be meeting farmers and ranchers. In the coffee shops and stores as you go about your pursuit of Deer, Elk, Pheasant,and quail. Should you come upon a person that has tumbled their load of hay on a back country road? Pull over, and give them a hand getting it back onto their trailer or truck. It’s a great way to get information on local animals, and just might open a door to huntable land.

I have written elsewhere on this blog about Bosque Del Oso SWA, and places that are close to Denver where birds can be found. Guess what? From the confluence of Clear Creek and the South Platte River near Commerce City all the way to the border there are what are probably the thickest populations of Rio Grande Turkey’s in the state. The stretch between Commerce City and Fort Lupton being exceptional habitat. Getting permission to hunt though, is often the toughest part of the hunt. Get permission before you apply for a limited license. That’s where pre-planning,and getting to know the locals comes in. What follows is a video of Wild Turkey’s in similar riparian habitat courtesy of the Colorado Division of Wildlife. Enjoy!

HERE


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